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Rynd Smith All Planned Out? - The Worldwide Impact of the British Town and Country Planning System
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Rynd Smith at Superbia

All Planned Out?
The Worldwide Impact of the British Town and Country Planning System

18 and 19 May 2007

Rynd Smith

Rynd Smith is Head of Policy and Practice for the Royal Town Planning Institute. He is a Member of both the Royal Town Planning Institute and the Planning Institute of Australia.

Rynd has a legal and planning background. He trained in law at the London School of Economics, and in planning at both the University of Sheffield and at the Université Lumière de Lyon, France.

In the UK Rynd has held policy and plan review roles for the voluntary sector, and has worked for local government in policy, regeneration, urban design, and major projects.

In Australia he worked for a State government implementing planning system reforms. For 7 years he worked as a Planning Inspector Manager, specialising in practice development, local development frameworks and the impact assessment of regional/national infrastructure. He has chaired public inquiries into motorway, power, renewables, new town, leisure, port and harbour, and dredging developments.

Website: www.rtpi.org.uk

e-mail: rynd.smith@rtpi.org.uk

click here for the Royal Town Planning Institute

9.40 to 11.00 on Friday 18 May 2007

Planning: From Collective Vision to Statutory System

Summary

We have all made plans for thousands of years. 60 years ago, the British State nationalised the use and development of land, and made planning a public process in the 1947 Town and Country Planning Act. So called because, for the first time, the same planning system applied to towns and to the countryside.

Land use planning was born, and the British public acquired rights to be involved in it.

Recent years have seen strong, largely economically based critiques of planning practice. Such as the report for the Treasury of December 2006 by Kate Barker at the Bank of England, The Barker Review of Land Use Planning.

Rynd examines these critiques, and strongly argues that we still need to plan, and to involve the public in planning. He also insists that our planning should be Spatial, and should lead to sustainable development.

click here for the Barker Review of Land Use Planning

Planning: From Collective Vision to Statutory System

More to follow shortly...

click here for details of Superbia, a day-school hosted by the Centre for Suburban Studies on 23 September 2006

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