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Jules Lubbock All Planned Out? - The Worldwide Impact of the British Town and Country Planning System
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1. Kate Barker, Barker Review of Housing Supply: Interim Report. London, HMSO, 10 December 2003, posted on www.hm-treasury.gov.uk

2. Kate Barker, Barker Review of Housing Supply: Final Report - Delivering stability: securing our future housing needs. London, HMSO, 17 March 2004, posted on www.hm-treasury.gov.uk

3. Kate Barker, Barker Review of Land Use Planning: Interim Report. London, HMSO, 4 July 2006, posted on www.hm-treasury.gov.uk

4. Kate Barker, Barker Review of Land Use Planning: Final Report - Recommendations. London, HMSO, 5 December 2006, posted on www.hm-treasury.gov.uk


All Planned Out?
The Worldwide Impact of the British Town and Country Planning System

18 and 19 May 2007

Jules Lubbock

Jules is a professor in the Department of Art History and Theory at the University of Essex, and author of The Tyranny of Taste: the Politics of Architecture and Design in Britain from 1550-1960 (1995)

He has written for the Times Literary Supplement, the London Review of Books, RIBA Journal, the Architects' Journal, Building Design, and the Architectural Review. He has been architecture critic for the New Statesman, and is a former speechwriter to the Prince of Wales.

Jules recently directed a four-year AHRC research project on Concepts of Self in the Theory and Practice of Architecture and Town-Planning since 1945 (2006). He recently published Storytelling in Christian Art from Giotto to Donatello, and is currently working on Trashing Taste: lifestyles, architecture and urbanism since 1960, a sequel to the Tyranny of Taste.

In 2001 Jules contributed Planning is the Problem to the international webzine www.opendemocracy.net, and this is recommended as background reading to his presentation:

clickPlanning is the Problem (July 2001)

click here for Open Democracy

Website: www2.essex.ac.uk/arthistory/architself

e-mail: lubbj@essex.ac.uk

click here for the Department of Art History and Theory at the University of Essex

11.30 to 13.00 on Saturday 19 May 2007

Can English Planning be Reformed?

Summary

click here for the Barker Review of Land Use Planning click here for the Barker Review of Housing Supply

Despite two Reviews commissioned by HM Treasury from Kate Barker at the Bank of England in four years, generating four reports (1, 2, 3 and 4), and a (promised) White Paper on liberalising the Town and Country Planning Acts, as well as projected legislation to reform them, I am highly sceptical that these reforms will be achieved in practice.

To understand why we have to examine the history of the 1947 Town and Country Planning Act. Both the pre-war campaign which led to its creation, and what has happened to it since.

Intended to provide the State with communist style discretionary powers to impose the location of industry and housing, the planning system has become subject to democratic pressure and consequently highly popular with "Nimbys", including Kate Barker herself.

Inequitable though this may be for indigent first-time buyers, I am hard pressed to imagine circumstances in which significant reform will be politically possible.

Can English Planning be Reformed?

More to follow shortly...

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