Click here to send us material for publication

Ivy Bridge Farm, Hounslow, London, abandoned and half completed in 1970 - See page 157 and Miles Glendinning's chapter for Why is construction so backward?
James Woudhuysen writesIan Abley writesMartin Pawley writesJames Heartfield writesMiffa Salter writesRichard McWilliams writes

ActivityServicesBooksShopLinksContact


email audacity.org

Return to Welcome



































































































Click here to buy Why is construction so backward?

Return to the front page of the website index for Why is construction so backward? by James Woudhuysen

Click here for Sustaining Architecture in the Anti-Machine Age, edited by Ian Abley and James Heartfield

Why is construction so backward? - Glasgow launch 19 February 2004

We are pleased that the book is launched at the Mackintosh School of Architecture, within the '... creative hothouse of artists, designers and architects that comprise the Glasgow School of Art,' designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Why is construction so backward? James Woudhuysen, Ian Abley, Stefan Muthesius and Miles Glendinning

The Glasgow School of ArtWe wanted a launch event in Glasgow because the Mackintosh School of Architecture, based in the splendid Glasgow School of Art designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh from 1896 to 1909, has supported us in the past. Also Miles Glendinning from the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland would be available to speak.

Architecture has been taught at the GSA from the middle of the 19th century. At the contemporary Mackintosh School of Architecture, the emphasis is on student-centred active learning. That means students are encouraged to develop their own direction and solutions, imaginatively and creatively, through set studio design projects, supported by full-time studio tutors and leading practitioners.

We are grateful to the Mackintosh School of Architecture for their continuing support and constructive criticism.

The public launch of Why is construction so backward? on Thursday 19 February 2004, between 6.00pm and 9.00 pm, at the Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art, 167 Renfrew Street, Glasgow, G3 6RQ (see map below) is free of charge.

Please register in advance by emailing Ian Abley with your name and address, as this helps us cater for attendance.

Refreshments are provided, and we are pleased to announce that the speakers at the launch are:

Click here for more about Simon Chadwick Simon Chadwick

Click here to visit the Glasgow School of ArtSimon Chadwick was Project Architect for a number of high specification residential developments in central London. In 2000 he began work with Foster and Partners, after which he was appointed to the Mackintosh School as a Studio Tutor of the undergraduate course, and the youngest member of academic staff. In 2003 he became Year Leader for the Second Year Course at the Mackintosh. Reflecting on his own experience Simon will introduce Why is construction so backward?.

Click here for more about Miles Glendinning Miles Glendinning

Click here to visit the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of ScotlandMiles Glendinning is a historian and writer based at the RCAHMS. He has played a prominent role in DOCOMOMO, the international working group for the documentation and conservation of Modern Movement buildings and sites. In 1994 he co-authored, with Stefan Muthesius, Tower Block published by Yale University Press. This investigated all aspects of the innovative post-war production of high-rise council blocks across the UK. Miles will talk on the lessons from that experience for would be housing designers and innovators today.

Click here for more about James Woudhuysen James Woudhuysen

Click here to visit De Montfort UniversityJames Woudhuysen, Professor of Forecasting and Innovation at De Montfort University, and principal author of Why is construction so backward? will consider the future for construction. He will suggest how the development sector might progress beyond present day risk aversion, reflected in the managerial, naturalistic and therapeutic perspectives of the construction industry.

The Glasgow School of Art

Ian Abley, a practicing architect and co-author of Why is construction so backward? commented:

"The book launch presents a wonderful occasion for people interested in architecture, engineering, IT and the wider construction industry - from the DIY enthusiast to the professional - to consider the question that nags all of us on a daily basis: Why is construction so backward?"

Click here to contact audacity.org"We wanted to launch the book in the company of the staff and students of the Mackintosh School of Architecture. We are doubly pleased at audacity.org that the guest speakers were keen to discuss the book and their insights on the question that James Woudhuysen so forcefully answers in Why is construction so backward?."

Click here to visit Prospect magazine‘A must-read for architecture students and also important for practitioners, this is a passionate critique of the construction industry and the planning process, and brings new depth to debate about the relationship between architecture and society.’ Penny Lewis, Editor, Prospect magazine - the leading magazine for the architectural and design communities in Scotland and the North West of England

For further details on the launch please contact Ian Abley by telephone on 07947 621 790, or by emailing abley@audacity.org.

For further details on the venue please contact Simon Chadwick, 2nd Year Leader, Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art, by telephone on 0141 353 4642, or by emailing s.chadwick@gsa.ac.uk

To buy this book Shop

Location of the Mackintosh School of Architecture in the Glasgow School of Art

Image produced from the Ordnance Survey Get-a-map service.

Image reproduced with kind permission of Ordnance Survey.

The Library at the Glasgow School of Art
Sustaining Architecture in the Anti-Machine Age, edited by Ian Abley and James Woudhuysen

This website is maintained by abley@audacity.org and all material is Copyright © 2004 Audacity Limited where not copyright of the originator.